Proposed changes to the Achievement scheme

1 year 7 months ago #1068 by DispicableMe
I wonder if anyone at the club bothered to read pages 40 and 41 of the BMFA News they received a short while back? in it the elderly Blazer brigade have done it again, requiring all future achievement scheme candidates to have an IQ of 130 or more and be school leavers with at least 3 "B"'s or have passed a Law degree at BA level. So much for encouraging junior members into our HOBBY!!!
Has AMARC sent in any comments to the new proposals or just laid on their backs and hope it goes away, I wonder how many current members can answer any of the proposed questions that will become mandatory from next month. Very soon we will all be asked to have a sit down written test before being allowed to get airborne with a MODEL AIRCRAFT, someone do something before it's to late and our hobby disappears into a quagmire of bureaucratic red tape and we need a Private Pilots Licence to get a LiPo battery.

BMFA Achievement Scheme Mandatory legal questions for all future tests. Candidates must correctly answer five questions, chosen from the list below by the examiner during the test.

Q(1) Who Regulates all civil flying activities over the United Kingdom, including model aircraft?
Q(2) How are the rules and regulations for flying established in law by Parliament (statute)?
Q(3) What does Article 137 of the ANO state?
Q(4) What does Article 138 of the ANO state?
Q(5) Who is legally responsible to ensure that a model is flown safely?
Q(6) Which Civil Aviation Publication (CAP) relates specifically to the use of model aircraft, and for which specific purposes only?
Q(7) According to CAP 658, which model aircraft are required to have an operating failsafe and what is the minimum setting?
- three key points
Q(8) What does Article 166 of the ANO say about the responsibilities of the person in charge of a small unmanned aircraft?
Q(9) What does Article 166 of the ANO say about visual contact with small unmanned aircraft?
Q(10) What does Article 166 of the ANO say about small unmanned aircraft over 7Kg? three key points
Q(11) What does Article 166 of the ANO say about 'aerial work' for small unmanned aircraft?
Q(12) How is a flight for the purpose of 'aerial work' defined?
Q(13) How is 'a small unmanned surveillance aircraft' defined
Q(14) What are the separation requirements of Article 167 for small unmanned surveillance aircraft - when operating over or within a congested area or organised open-air assembly of more than 1,000 persons?
Q(15) What are the separation requirements of Article 167 - for small unmanned surveillance aircraft - in respect of any vessel, vehicle or structure which is not under control of the person in charge of the aircraft?
Q(16) Except during take-off and landing, what are the separation requirements of Article 167 - for small unmanned surveillance aircraft - excluding the person in charge of the aircraft or anyone under their control?
Q(17) What must be obtained before any flight within controlled airspace or an ATZ?
Q(18) CAA General Exemption E 4049 - permits FPV flight without a buddy box, but with a competent observer. (a) How must the competent observer monitor the flight and (b) What is the maximum mass of aircraft that may be flown under this exemption?
Q(19) Who has legal responsibility for the safety of an FPV flight (a) conducted with a buddy box lead and (b) conducted without a buddy box lead?
Q(20) According to CAP 658 what are the 8 'Only fly if' checks for an FPV flight of an aircraft over 3.5kg?
The following user(s) said Thank You: bumble.b., frankc

Please Log in to join the conversation.

1 year 7 months ago #1072 by spence
Has AMARC sent in any comments to the new proposals or just laid on their backs and hope it goes away,

Is there really any need for this comment? The committee work very hard to provide an excellent flying club for all.

Steve
The following user(s) said Thank You: chris

Please Log in to join the conversation.

1 year 7 months ago #1073 by DispicableMe
So they might but you appear to have completely missed the the point of my comment as it had nothing to do with the workload of the committee but concerned the extra questions that will be required when candidates sit their A or B certificates and what has AMARC done about them.
I am still waiting in vain it seems for an answer, one word will do, Something or Nothing

Please Log in to join the conversation.

1 year 7 months ago #1074 by bumble.b.
Hi peter.Droning on not on general list front page.Look under general and read carl;s last post this may answer your query.

Please Log in to join the conversation.

1 year 7 months ago - 1 year 7 months ago #1075 by chris
Hi Guys
Here is my answers to the proposed bmfa achievement scheme questions took me about three hours to finish as I don't fly fpv or drones, some questions I found on websites other than the bmfa handbook 2015 (in amarc doc's)
the fixed wing 'A' test will have very little of these questions as most are for the new basic proficiency certificate (bpc) Fpv, drones ect, Most of our 'A' test candidates will take the conventional test. Which has been in existence for years and is not scary at all.
So all this for a bit of fun and i'm sure people will message me back saying you got that one wrong but hay I had ago are you up to the challenge.

Q(1) Who Regulates all civil flying activities over the United Kingdom, including model aircraft ANSWER
CIVIL AVIATION AUTHORITY (CAA)

Q(2) How are the rules and regulations for flying established in law by Parliament (statute) ANSWER
AIR NAVIGATION ORDER (ANO)

Q(3) What does Article 137 of the ANO state ANSWER Article137; ‘A person must not recklessly or negligently act in a manner likely to endanger an aircraft, or any person in an aircraft’

Q(4) What does Article 138 of the ANO state ANSWER
Article 138; “A person must not recklessly or negligently cause or permit an aircraft to endanger any person or property”

Q(5) Who is legally responsible to ensure that a model is flown safely ANSWER You are personally responsible for any flights you make and knowledge of your legal responsibilities is important.

Q(6) Which Civil Aviation Publication (CAP) relates specifically to the use of model aircraft, and for which specific purposes only ANSWER CIVIL AVIATION PUBLICATION (CAP) 658, For hobby and leisure activities only

Q(7) According to CAP 658, which model aircraft are required to have an operating failsafe and what is the minimum setting?
- three key points ANSWER
(1) Any powered model aircraft fitted with a receiver capable of operating in failsafe mode should have the failsafe set, as a minimum, to reduce the engine(s) speed to idle on loss or corruption of signal.
(2)For Models Weighing 7 to 20 kg A serviceable ‘fail-safe’ mechanism should be incorporated to operate on loss of signal or detection of an interfering signal. For example on a power driven model this should operate, as a minimum, to reduce the engine(s) speed to idle.
(3) For All Gas Turbines All gas turbine models should be fitted with a failsafe. This must bring the engine to idle in the event of radio interference or failure. The fuel system must be capable of manual shut off via a fuel valve or fuel pump switch.

Q (8) What does Article 166 of the ANO say about the responsibilities of the person in charge of a small unmanned aircraft
ANSWER The person in charge of a small unmanned aircraft may only fly the aircraft if reasonably satisfied that the flight can safely be made.

Q(9) What does Article 166 of the ANO say about visual contact with small unmanned aircraft
ANSWER The person in charge of a small unmanned aircraft must maintain direct, unaided visual contact with the aircraft sufficient to monitor its flight path in relation to other aircraft, persons, vehicles, vessels and structures for the purpose of avoiding collisions.

Q(10) What does Article 166 of the ANO say about small unmanned aircraft over 7Kg? three key points
ANSWER The person in charge of a small unmanned aircraft which has a mass of more than 7 kg excluding its fuel but including any articles installed in or attached to the aircraft at the commencement of its flight, must not fly such an aircraft:
a) in Class A, C, D or E airspace unless the permission of the appropriate air traffic control unit has been obtained;
b) within an aerodrome traffic zone during the notified hours of watch of the air traffic unit (if any) at that aerodrome unless the permission of any such air traffic control unit has been obtained; or
c) at a height of more than 400 feet above the surface unless it is flying in airspace described in sub-paragraph (a) or (b) above and in accordance with the requirements for that airspace.

Q(11) What does Article 166 of the ANO say about 'aerial work' for small unmanned aircraft
ANSWER The person in charge of a small unmanned aircraft must not fly such an aircraft for the purposes of aerial work except in accordance with a permission granted by the CAA.

Q(12) How is a flight for the purpose of 'aerial work' defined
ANSWER Aerial work is any paid work undertaken by an aircraft

Q(13) How is 'a small unmanned surveillance aircraft' defined
ANSWER > Sutch aircraft are popularly known as drones

Q(14) What are the separation requirements of Article 167 for small unmanned surveillance aircraft - when operating over or within a congested area or organised open-air assembly of more than 1,000 persons
Answer > over or within 150 metres of an organised open-air assembly of more than 1,000 persons;

Q(15) What are the separation requirements of Article 167 - for small unmanned surveillance aircraft - in respect of any vessel, vehicle or structure which is not under control of the person in charge of the aircraft Answer > within 50 metres of any vessel, vehicle or structure which is not under the control of the person in charge of the aircraft;

Q(16) Except during take-off and landing, what are the separation requirements of Article 167 - for small unmanned surveillance aircraft - excluding the person in charge of the aircraft or anyone under their control Answer > during take-off or landing, a small unmanned surveillance aircraft must not be flown within 30 metres of any person.

Q(17) What must be obtained before any flight within controlled airspace or an ATZ Answer > Permission to fly from the relevant authority.

Q(18) CAA General Exemption E 4049 - permits FPV flight without a buddy box, but with a competent observer.
(a) How must the competent observer monitor the flight
Answer > to ensure that direct unaided visual contact is maintained with the aircraft sufficient to monitor its flight path in relation to other aircraft, persons, vehicles, vessels and structures for the purpose of avoiding collisions
(b) What is the maximum mass of aircraft that may be flown under this exemption
Answer > The maximum take-off mass of the Small Unmanned Aircraft (SUA) does not exceed 3.5 kg, including any batteries or fuel.

Q(19) Who has legal responsibility for the safety of an FPV flight
(a) conducted with a buddy box lead
Answer > The person using the master transmitter
(b) conducted without a buddy box lead
Answer > The person using the transmitter

Q(20) According to CAP 658 what are the 8 'Only fly if' checks for an FPV flight of an aircraft over 3.5kg Answer >
• the activity is solely for 'sport and recreation' purposes;
• two pilots take part;
• a Buddy Box system is employed;
• the person in charge operates the master transmitter;
• the person in charge does not wear the headset or view a screen;
• the aircraft remains within the natural unaided visual range of the person in charge;
• reliable operation of the Buddy Box is established; and
• a clear handover protocol is established.

Happy Flying
Chris
The following user(s) said Thank You: Redeye, bumble.b., Carl, paragon

Please Log in to join the conversation.

1 year 7 months ago #1076 by Carl
Well done Chris, I agree with all your answers. I also went through the twenty questions but wasn't brave enough to post them, mine ran to about six pages so well done for being so succinct!
The airspace classification system always creates a few questions; essentially all airspace above the UK is classified from A to G. Classes A to F are in effect controlled airspace, Gordano and Hengrove are in class G airspace which was formerly free or unclassified airspace but they decided to give it a name thanks to EASA. As long as we remain in Class G airspace we are free to fly!

I hope that helps.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Redeye, chris, paragon

Please Log in to join the conversation.

Time to create page: 1.070 seconds
Powered by Kunena Forum